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the economy to improve, but at a slower rate than the united states and develops nations. he's attending the g20 finance minister meetings. from the council on foreign relations, this is an hour. >> [inaudible] >> well, ladies and gentlemen, i'm cochair of the council on foreign relations, and we are privileged, indeed to have with us the honorable, highly experienced german government offiho crrently serving a minister o finance. you have the resumÉ, we are running late, and to maximize time for conversation, i'll be undipmatically brief, but let me say that minister has held four positions of chandler cole who served as federal minister for special tasks, head of the council and minister of the interior. under chancellor merkel 2005 to 2009 served as ministers of the interior. he is a long standing leader of the christian democratic union serving as its chair in 1991. he's bee a 1972 serving as parment ri whip from 1981-84, and in 1990, led negotiations for the reimplication of east east germ. he is proficient in economics of law, a doctor of law, and he's written a number of books most rec
, that doesn't involve risks to the government micromanaging the economy. if you say okay which is going to have a flat tariff of 10% or 20% or 30% whatever it takes to get to a zero trade deficit that doesn't introduce a lot of corruption or a lot of dangers bad policymaking because it's a very simple policy. it's just determined by an arithmetical formula and there's no opportunity for anybody to play games. one of the good things about it if you have a flat tariff, is if you had a 30% tariff on imported goods that's not enough to relocate the production of t-shirts that united states because cost is too great. it's great to relocate things like silicon wafer fabrication so would tend to relocate back to the u.s. high value capital-intensive skill intensive industries which is of course what we want to do. those are the industries that are high-quality -- high-quality into she wants to have and those are the industries that don't want to lose. i point that out just to point out that if you do get serious about protectionism, protectionism has a logic to it which if you understand what
. maybe this shows it is very positive from the standpoint of the economy, if you use dynamic scoring. if you use statics deploring it is not and cannot so well. -- static scoring it is not going to come out so well. i have a question for the other witness. you said this in your statement tionhis is aasnab. the obvious question is whether or not there are sufficient jobs for average americans and illegal immigrants. the answer is no. >> as i indicated to us recently. latere have a participation rate we have a supply of low-skilled labor. it appears that what do is leapfrogging those individuals. we have millions upon millions of americans, not just black americans, but millions upon millions who do not have a job right now. i think it is a good idea to inform -- to reform immigration system but regard must be given to the fact that we have an over abundance of people not working today. we are at rates we have not sn in 80, 75 years. it is astonishing. if we have regularize asian of a greater pool of individuals who can compete on a one by one basis with americans here today those indi
. this looks that the impact on jobs and the economy. >> immigration. the average american wants to -- >> grace wiseman second place winners in the student cam, petition. their message look set a legal immigration and the impact on jobs in the u.s. economy. >> immigration, allowing people to enter our borders can be beneficial to immigrants and the rest of the country. >> when it comes to immigration, it is not right versus left, republican vs. democrat issue. it is those who have power to influence policy. and the average american heart regardless of political affiliation does want to see immigration laws enforced. amnesty. chris immigration laws. take up the highest unemployment rate right now is the young people. -- >> the highest and a plummet right now is the young people. the problem is is the way we have done it, they do not pay tax. you have to pay tax. and the employer would pay the tax. a ford are did not pay because it will not be here -- foreigner does not pay because they will not be here long. but we did not have the employer pay either. if the employer hires you, you will have to
or does it matter if an economy will print or grow or whatever? >> the study which said once government debt hits 90% of gdp growth goes off a cliff has been thoroughly discredited and they must kick themselves that they made a mistake on the spreadsheet. people pay attention to the paper which has just come out that shows that this is a pretty sloppy piece of work. the conclusion drawn in terms of the impact of high debt to growth has been basically discredited now. it's fairly clear that governments have a lot more scope to deal with problems. >> was china wrong to pursue this strategy then to help cushion the effect of the global financial crisis and even though people are quite concerned about it including some of the chinese themselves, it sounds like from what you're saying all things considered you don't see a hard landing or crisis as a result. >> as you always say in china, it's too early to tell. i think they have a margin to get things right. if you look at greece, they went into european monetary union and have this lovely window to fix things. a lot of credit with foreign i
includes a substantial drop we experienced with the recession in 2008 and 2009 and a fairly week economy since then. it says that people do value hard copy correspondence from businesses. they want that information in hard copy and they're resisting the idea of going totally digital. we've heard of people that did do that and either piss manied a payment or got nervous and said hey, start those bills back up again. don't write the obituary for first class mail. it accounts for $28 billion of revenue for the postal service today and i guarantee you it's the going to be around for a long while. the most promising part of our business in terms of growth is package delivery, which is up ricin threat. mail got delivered. you saw what happened with hurricane sandy, the mail got delivered. day in and day out, do an excellent job and the postal service plays an important role in the american economy but today it has a business model that is broken. the good thus -- news is that it can be fixed. it requires we ask fundamental questions about what kind of postal service is best for america in the
agricultural workers to seek nonfarm jobs as economy improved in the 1990s. the special agricultural workers who left farm work were replaced by new arrived unauthorized migrant. by 1997 and 1998 it was estimated that the special agricultural workers were only about 16% of the crop workers. so, mr. connor, aren't we afraid or shouldn't we be afraid giving legal status to people here illegally will repeat the mistakes we made in 1986 putting the ag industry in the same position in the long run. in other words it comes about because of farmers come to us and they need workers. okay. we bring in the workers. then they migrate someplace else and people illegally came in after wards. how do we avoid the mistake we made in 1986? >> senate grassley, your question is a great question. it's -- it goes to the heart of fundamentally of the basis of our negotiation that on o- curing in senator feinstein's office. the blue card program for the current existing trained work force is an important component. equal we don't know with absolute certainty over the next decade or so what is going to be the statu
insight on the global economy, as well as the impact of new security concerns in light of the tragic and deadly bombings in boston. >> yeah, it was of course, at this hour when we first learned yesterday of the horrific events unfolding in boston. that is where our scott cohn is right now with the very latest. scott, one day later, what can you tell us? >> reporter: maria, 24 hours after the horrific attacks, it is still an intense crime scene behind me, as authorities try to search for any clues about who did this and why. u.s. attorney general eric holder out with a statement a short time ago, again, calling on the public to help, saying no bit of evidence is too small. they are looking for cell phone video, anything that can help them figure out and piece the facts together. we also know that the boston athletic association, which stages this marathon every year, had three surveillance cameras at the finish line. the company that provided those cameras under a sponsorship agreement tells cnbc they are cooperating with authorities. we will see whether that yields anything, but what
rights prevail our countries where people do better, economies thrive, rule of law is stronger, governments are more effective and more responsive, and they are countries that lead on the world stage and project stability across their regions. strong respect for human rights isn't merely an indicator that a country is likely doing well. it actually unleashes a countries potential, and it helps to advance growth and progress. so i ask you just to think of the country like burma for a minute. because of steps towards democratic reform and stronger human rights protections, a country that had been isolated for years is now making progress. as it reached where we wanted to be? know, but it's on the road. it's moving. and more people are contributed economy and participating in the government, leading toasr growth andnt. and by starting to embrace universal rights, the burmese government has opened the doors to a stronger partnership with their neighborhood and with countries around the world. many challenges remain. corruption has to be rooted out. remaining political prisoners nee
a majority in congress since 1997. the mexican economy has expanded mexican have maintained growth since 2009. fromdp has increased $7,979 in 2009, to 2146 in 2011. in purchasing above 15,500. on gdp growth, almost four%, a higher rate, and is expected to grow 3.5% in the year. this is measured by j.p. morgan. mexico is also taking care of its people. the brookings institution has highlighted that 60% of mexicans are middle class. by 2030, 80.5% of mexicans will be middle class. housing has increased more in the early 1's. all of these factors that have taken place review the immigration pressures of the past. academic think tanks estimate that net migration between mexico and the united states is close to zero. a recent survey shows only 11% of mexicans say they would leave mexico if given the opportunity. a decline of about half from a 31% 2007. -- in 2007. over the last few years, our common border has increasingly become an area of prosperity. more more dynamic and secure than it has ever been. four in the united states and six in mexico, have a population of 92 minute -- 90 million peopl
manufacturing sector, creating new jobs and growing the economy for american families. energy is the foundation of our economy. we need to focus on the promise of prosperity. north american energy prosperity and the abundance that it offers to our country. america's greatness is tied to our freedom to produce and build things. republicans have a plan to grow our economy by making america a nation of builders once again. we want to streamline our government, cut red tape, and unleash the power of north american energy. with these things we can revitalize american manufacturing, and foster long-term economic growth and job creation for our citizens. lastly, we're determined to get to the truth regarding the terrorist attack on our nation's in benghazi, libya. in which three americans lost their lives. last year, i directed five committees to look at there is parts of this investigation. the next week, these committees will provide a comprehensive progress report on the investigation up to now. and this progress report will not represent the conclusion of their investigation, but it will be the be
. part of it is the economy. improving economy in the united states tends to attract people as well. we just haven't seen that, but monitor those flms -- numbers. we have -- the thing that troubles me the most is the smugglers who do this for profit, who are taking creative routes either up through the bahamas, we're seeing haitians being run through puerto rico right now. so it's a constant battle as the smugglers get smarter and daring. they are smaller than the land border. >> the smuggler industry, for lack of a better term, is that on the increase, is that on the decrease? what's the trend? it's an recollection spencive undertaking. my understanding is they charge thousands of dollars per person they bring. is that something we've seen an increase in or decrease and if we've seen a decrease, is it because of economic factors? how do we stop these? it sounds like a fast boat through the middle of the caribbean is not something we would necessarily stop. >> i think flow of migrants, it's similar to the flow of drugs. people are very creative. yes, we've seen an increase in those peop
workers is significant in our stagnant economy. the unemployment rate for blacks without a high school diploma was 12 percent, today, it's more than doubled, to 24.6%. now, that clearly shows that we have an oversupply of low skilled labor relative to the -- that is for workers in all such classes, particularly black americans, because research shows that 40 percent of the 18-point percentage decline in the employment rates of black males is attributable to illegal immigration. that's hundreds of thousands of blacks without jobs. it translates to hundreds of thousands who can't pay taxes, who don't support their families on their own dime. the evidence also indicated that in addition to the pressing wage -- sorry, employment levels, illegal immigration drove down wage levels, by the federal reserve bank of atlanta, for example, showed that illegal immigration, and the spike in illegal immigration, was attributable to the nearly $960 per year decrease in wage levels of documented georgians. and the leisure and hospitality industries, it was $1520. for doctors and lawyers, $960 may not b
teach japan economy at georgetown. you're making the summit interesting again. the interesting problems that you face, and i d not envy you, is you said the fits call consolidation, the consumption tax will go up next year and the following year, and you're certainly aware that will take a big hit on consumption on income that will have a negative impact on the economy, and i'm wondering how you're balancing these two different issues of fiscal consolidation and demand. [speaking japanese] >> translator: i think you have hit on the most important point, because whenever we may try to increase the taxes, it does not necessarily result in increasing the tax revenue. we have known the actual examples which have happened in the past in many nrsakg ne >> you can watch the rest of this online as we take you live now to the heritage foundation in washington, d.c. for remarks by senator mike lee of utah. he'll be talking about the conservative movement and the future of the republican party. >> in his most recent book, "we still hold these truths: rediscovering our principles, reclaiming our fu
. it is the perfect example of the program benefits for the economy and local community where jobs are scarce and a part of vermont where conventional lending is not an option. we appreciate the inclusion of permanent authorization of this important program. we also very much appreciate inclusion of the reforms to the program, highly important to employers in the seasonal industries. ski resorts in the winter, beach communities and this summer rely on these workers to not -- and not only prove to be excellent employees but bring a cultural experience to states that do not necessarily enjoyed a great deal of diversity. when a trained employee can return for several years in a row, it is a great benefit to all. we thank you for including the sections into the bill. in order to enhance security while adding -- in order to enhance security while also facilitating legitimate travel and trade, we strongly support the addition of but 3500 custom boer patrol officers included in the legislation. in order to ensure that officers are allocated properly, we urge the committee to work with cpb to specify
obama, i sided with john kerry, i sided with barney frank. on ensuring our entire economy did not collapse. the bush administration for eight years had turned a blind eye to the fact that a casino had been set up on wall street that was now leading to a collapse of our economy. in 2008, i did not support any of the bush administration era financial regulation policies. but when the threat was that the system was going to collapse and hurt every family in america, i did vote to protect our financial system from collapsing and you did not. in addition, on telecommunications, yes, it was my legislation that broke down the telecom monopolies, cable monopolies that led to a broadband revolution beginning in 1996 that has created millions of jobs in the united states of america, including tens of thousands of them here in the massachusetts economy. and i'm very proud of that. and my name is on the legislation, steve. and i'm proud that my name is on much of that legislation because it was my job to go to washington -- >> that's my point. that's my point. you said we weren't -- that'
with the underpinnings of education and issues like that then allow us to be competitive in a global economy. i think the potential is there. we need to get our act together and that means we need to sit down, work together and resolve issues. .ost: larry, ohio independent caller. caller: good morning. host: good morning. caller: this gentleman keeps referring to the crime scenes, the violent crimes. 99% of us gun owners are law- abiding and that is the way we use our guns. internet sales -- you cannot ship a gun in the united states unless it is shipped by a fll dealer and once you receive that done at your dealer, you have to go through background checks. on the crystal ball thing -- host: larry, let me leave it there and have the congressman respond because that is the front page of "the new york times" dealing with internet sales. what do you make of his comment? guest: first of all, we do have background checks today, but the problem is there are loopholes. the number is about half of the gun sales in the country are not subject to a background check. some are emaciated on the internet. some are
strong human rights prevail are countries where people do better. economies thrive, rule of law are stronger, governments are more effective and they are countries that leade wod stage and project stability across their regions. strong respect for human rights isn't just an indicator that a country is doing well, it unleashes a country's potential and helps to advance growth and progress. i ask you to think of a country like berma for a minute. cause of steps towards democratic reform and stronger human rights protections a country that has been isolated for years is now making progress. has it reach wrd we want it to be? no but it is on the road and it is moving. more people are participating it ding to faster growth and development. by starting to embrace universal rights the bermese government is opening their doors and developing stronger partnerships around the world. many challenges remain, corruption has to be rooted out. political prisoners need to be freed. horrible mob violence is another stressing reminder on how long it takes to build what is called the habits of the
was not working. >> that's a good point. you thought maybe stand above all of the other lesser economies and the news did start to tighten. >> i thought it was the most important article in the paper. maybe they're breaking ranks [ bell ringing ] >> and his own jack lou? >> hard to tell. >> they are geniuses. >> i took economics, and i couldn't wait how long they were. >> there's the bell. s&p at the top of the screen. state street global advisers and blackstone celebrating the recent launch of the spider, senior loan etf. the texas independent producers and the royalty owners association doing the honors. you cannot start this market day, jim, without talking about netflix. a 25% move is a big move even on that name. >> that was a big short position. there was not a lot of stock that was out there. it's a very tight flow. >> a lot of people kept thinking that this is the quarter where we find that the bulge in new subscribers wasn't happening and there are other people who immediately point out, look, the cash flow is not that good and the 36 analysts who cover the stock only six are re
for the sequester, which is currently having and will have a very, very negative effect on our economy, on jobs, and on the confidence that americans have that we are pursuing rational policy. the the gentleman and i both have agreed that sequester is not a rational policy. it deals with high priority and low priority items in very much the same way. so my question, mr. leader, is there a possibility, not on the calendar, you didn't announc it, bui w you that we go to conference, preferably, the first day we are back, after this weekend, so that we could get to work on trying to get to an agreement on one of the most pressing problems in front of this country, and that's getting ourselves on a fiscally sustainable path. i yield to my friend. mr. cantor: i thank the gentleman. i appreciate the spirit with which he recommends that we proceed along the lines of those individuals that he spoke about had asked for. and i would say to the gentleman, mr. speaker, that i'm told that our chairman and the chairman on the other side of the capitol, ms. murry, they are meeting and looking to see the path f
economy work and define those things that are going to lead our country forward. it is a privilege to be here with you talking about ideas from the working families flexibility act that you are working hard on and i'm a proud co-sponsor but also ways we are going to find solutions for people across this country who are raising families, trying to pay for college trying to pay the energy bill for the month. mr. gardner: we have an incredible opportunity to get government out of the way and let america work, to unleash the entrepreneurs around this great nation over the past several months over the past couple of years, we have held dozens of town meetings, whether they are in southeastern colorado, northeastern colorado, the denver metro area, the new parts of my district, talking to families, talking to people who are struggling to make ends meet. people who have had to pick up a second job just to pay the bills. and as we talk tonight about making life work and i believe #makinglifework and i would like to hear from people around the country how we an help be a part of these solut
will go. and sometimes invest in a place where the economy is not where it would support necessarily a market solution, which is why a.i.d. has to be there. so you've got the millennium challenge corporation over here, a.i.d. as the preponderance of our expenditure, but it has adopted significant reforms in the last years that have actually movement some of the development challenge kinds of enterprize into a.i.d. wherever we can we are trying to do economic-based aid in a local way that is sustainable. and that will result in long-term gains, not a project that comes, and when the project's over the money's gone and there is nothing to show for it. but there are someplaces where you still have humanitarian demands and other demands that will not lend themselves to that, and we just need to understand that. we have to understand that's for the minimum -- minimalist fraction of the percentage of our aid that may represent, it's still an expression of our values and interest and it's important. now we are -- i'm not going to sit here and tell this committee that the job is done. we are
. indeed, our affordable universal service is crucial to the american economy and to american businesses that generate 95% of all mail. my written testimony offers a comprehensive set of options to restore the postal service to solvency. this morning i will cover, this afternoon i will cover the issues you specifically asked me to address in your invitation. on cost savings, the nalc and the other postal unions have contributed billions in savings through collective bargaining. that process concluded for just 12 weeks ago. the new nalc contract emerged from interest arbitration that focused on the financial condition of the postal service that led to award if you want to provide postal service with huge savings in the years to come. as we did during the great recession when we worked tirelessly with management to adjust routes to respond to mail voe' done, more must be done and congresseeds to do its part as well. i will highlight two cost reforms from the written testimony. first congress should repeal or dramatically reduce the retiree health prefunding mandate that caused over 80% of
economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: 27 runners and thousands more spectators had turned out for the boston marathon today when terror erupted. two bombs exploded, and authorities said two people were killed and more than 50 others were wounded. (sirens). within minutes of the blast, wheelchairs and stretchers were ferrying victims up and down boylston street, the home stretch of the oldest marathon race in the world. amid the chaos competitors, race volunteers and spectators ran from the scene in shock. >> i went over there. there were body parts. people were blown apart. they're dead. where the wind owe is, the windows were all blown out. >> ifill: the attack came about thr
know you are aware six of the 10 fastest growing economies in the world are located in sub- saharan africa, and it is my hope to the extent possible that the state department will prioritize trade with the african nations. you should know that we have a bipartisan, bicameral effort working in conjunction with chairman smith to quickly put forward a renewal of the africa growth and opportunity act. so i have four questions i'd like to ask you. i wanted to know what steps are you taking to focus on africa's extraordinary growth potential? what are your thoughts about the u.s. appointing a special envoy to the d.r.c.? does the request for peacekeeping operations accurately reflect the growing needs on the continent? and can you comment on the significance of the 6% cuts to usaid hiv-aids funding. >> let me emphasize first of all that we are really pleased that pepfar was able to be held whole. i think that's vital. i have personally visited, i was in durbin, north of durbin in the mountains watching how that program is being effectively administered and the difference it has made. we a
, with difficulty in keeping together the chavez coalition in resolving the deep problems of the economy in light of a devaluation in resolving the atrocious situation of crime and violence in the country. how he will keep those very factions of the party together and at the same time tackle these very deep seated problems is really a big question. i think it leaves open the possibility for a great deal more instability. >> suarez: it sounds like it's going to be difficult to run venezuela, whoever takes the loath of president. 30-plus percent inflation, high crimes. those facts. >> 20% last year. it's picked up a little in the last few months but or significantly in the last few months. i think that was part of the problem for maduro. i think there are serious challenges ahead. we don't want to exaggerate them too much. for 14 years, the business press has been saying that the venezuelan economy is going to collapse. it never did. it won't either. they always say it's unsus sanable. that's what we had in 2006 when you have an $8 trillion housing bubble and anybody who is looking at it which did
of this economy that are going strong? like housing. a totally domestic industry. not france, not generation not socgen. that's not going to be droild by european woes or a chinese slowdown. they have nothing to do with each other. the housing comeback is still with us. as we know from yesterday's terrific housing starts number. and this is the kind of huge multiyear theme that's going to keep powering forward no matter what you're fretting about. take a look at this chart of new housing starts. you can see that we're very much on the upswing. but we still have a long way to go before we reach the elevated levels that we saw back in 2005-2006. so how do we play the housing resurgence? right now what do we do? what can we snoen what about realogy? a huge realtor that's the world's largest fran schooizer of residential real estate brokerages. coldwell banker, century 21, sotheby's, better homes and garde gardens. last year this company was involved in more thain quarter of all domestic home sales transactions that involved the broker. they are that big. they came public back on october 27th. i
to private sector federal systems, the nation at critical infrastructure and our economy. it supports the president's executive order to improve on the cyber security and critical infrastructure security and resilience. finally, to ensure continued resilience to disasters, the president's budget focuses on emergency management. it includes resources for the disaster relief fund for declared disasters or emergencies. the administration is proposing the consolidation of 18 grant programs into one national program to create a robust national response capacity while reducing administrative overhead. this competitive, risk based program will use a comprehensive process to identify and deploy capabilities, put funding together quickly and require grantees to report on their progress. it is this kind of funding that has enhanced capabilities in cities like boston. since 2002, the boston urban area has received $300 million in federal grant funding, which is used to equip tactical teams. within the last year, the metro boston homeland security region used funding to provide training to improv
immigration can affect the u.s. economy. a hearing on friday. then on monday a second hearing. after that we have to see how the process unfolds. especially republicans on the judiciary committee are calling for more than the currently scheduled hearings. probably sometime in early may we will move to the markup process which is where the senators on the judiciary committee can begin offering amendments and releasing how they want to continue to shape the bill. we hope it gets passed out of committee and go to the senate floor. host: rebekah kaplan of the national journal. wilmington, north carolina, kathleen is on our democrat line. is roberta our guest aplan.rebecca caller: my biggest fear is that our country is in a state of fear. thing wehe worst could ever have as americans. we have based our country from the beginning of a great work ethic. there are so many things we could do instead of being frightened every time something happens. domestically, foreman, and immigration. we have a statue of liberty that does welcome everybody. i believe that we should give some amnesty, because of am
the economy grow and every state. >> there has been some discussion about discretion. under current practice they use the authority very sparingly. it said is have shown roughly 1% of all cases. how much more should we expect the department to exercise ?iscretion decks >> mardy do that pursuant to policy. -- we do not think that is pursuant to policy. >> they spent time the information from own cases. significantspend time because there's a discovery .rocess >> provided we have the resources to pull the files, i would have no objection. one of the real logistical issues is contained in paper files. resources, anything we can do to share mind this would be something to be considered. >> the department may have seen some benefits in terms of the overall efficiency. >> what privacy protections need to be put in place to ensure employers to not miss use the system? how with this legislation and improve on it? do you think it to be appropriate to give the states additional funds with the assumption they will meet this ?bligation tax >> theirallows them to put driver's license and database databas
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haunting these cities so even though the economy is coming back and money is coming in, a lot of it is already spent. >> if we go back to the police, what does this mean for the sheriff's patrols that oakland has been bringing in to help out the police? >> reporter: good point. good point. as you know, they have been contracting out with the alameda county sheriff's department and the highway patrol for that matter to put extra cops on the streets and patrol. those patrols are going to stay in place. they have the money to keep them there until these other cops get out of the academies. so that's a good piece of news there, as well. thanks for bringing that up. >> all right, phil matier, thank you. >>> definitely social media has changed police work. >> coming up, how private citizens are combing through countless photos searching for a clue to capture the boston marathon bomber. >> i think anytime you try to take out a critical infrastructure, i would say that's sabotage. >> the new incentive to capture the vandals who crippled phone service in the south bay. >> it has been r
for the u.s. economy. dramatically.at we discovered our immigration system had failed. a number of these individuals should have been allowed into the united states. there was a lot soul-searching about how to correct these problems. the number of visitors to the united states went down dramatically. we have put in place systems in terms oftty good screening. we're trying to have the best of both worlds. we want to encourage people to come to our country. we want to be able to keep up those who are likely to do was this kind of harm. it is a balancing act. the perfect from becoming the enemy of the good? guest: in an open country like the united states, we always have been, you cannot have perfect security. it doesn't mean you cannot do better. host: denver from new mexico. from mexico. caller: i would like to make a comment about the borders. terroristic camps popping up everywhere. again and ages form in these other places that is hard to reach. they are training on the mexico sied states. they are, across our borders -- they are coming across our borders. they are getting aro
currently in our country illegally. many have been here for years and contributing to our economy. knowing who they are is critical to public safety. it must be evidence from the outset there is a pathway to citizenship that will be fair and a tenable. .- fair and attainable dreamers and immigrant farm workers will also be included. those who complete the requirements will be able to achieve lawful status more quickly. the bill will improve our legal immigration system. visas.ses the cap on thes it continues to protect vulnerable immigrants. it creates new temporary worker programs while protecting american workers. businesses must be able to maintain a stable legal workforce if our economy is to continue to grow. this will pressure on the border and reduce illegal flows. the majority of americans support these common sense steps. we are ready to implement them. we can and we will achieve the core provisions of the bill. we stand ready to work with the congress to achieve this important goal. the introduction of this legislation is indeed a milestone. i look forward to continue to working
private initiative to the economy, and reagan realized that. you don't find out about this at the reagan library but reagan met with gorbachev at reykjavik, famously, and the two almost agreed to nuclear disarmament. the reaganites in the defense department were horrified by this and put a stop to it but reagan didn't go all the way with reaganism when he had a chance to end the cold war, especially the nuclear threats. so it's a hard-core republican belief. if you remember the pup pup prime -- republican primaries of 2012, it was not that long ago there were eight or ten republican candidates in simi valley for a debate at the reagan library and every one of them said reagan set the example how maring be strong, reagan did with the soviet union and we should do it today in iran, we should do it -- we were right toy trite in iraq. america should use its power to achieve its spend destroy its enemies. i worked in the cold war and in the middle east. you have 29% of the american people agree with that today. >> richard, do you want to say something? you're leaning forward. >> no. >> okay.
this make our information and economy quite safer. aest: catherine lotrionte is professor at georgetown university and has been talking to us about cyber security and privacy. thank you for being on the program. guest: thank you. >> tomorrow on washington ahead to a gunk and immigration legislation. then the executive director of the national consortium for the study of terrorism and responses to terrorism. and the constitution project on the treatment of detainees and the use of torture by the united states. live atton journal," 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. this week, both weekly addresses focused on the boston marathon bombings. at first, president obama, then the republican address from senator tim scott of south carolina. >> on monday, an act of terror when did dozens and killed three innocent people at the boston marathon. but in the days since, the world has witnessed one sure and steadfast truth -- americans refuse to be terrorized. ultimately, that is what we will remember from this week. that is what will remain. as stories of heroism and kindness, resolve and resilience, gener
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